Anne Frank House In Amsterdam: The Historical Attraction

Anne Frank House In Amsterdam
Anne Frank House In Amsterdam
Anne Frank House In Amsterdam
Anne Frank House In Amsterdam

The building at Prinsengracht 263, now famously known as the Anne Frank house is marked for its connection with Anne Frank whose diary explained the horrors of the Jew genocide during the Second World War and how that affected the community. The building is currently a popular tourist destination in Amsterdam visited by people curious about the war history of the country.

The History

Otto Frank, the father of Anne Frank, had his business set up in Prinsengracht 263. Alongside the Van Pels family, the Frank family and Fritz Pfeffer hid in the annex of the building. The annex was inconspicuous because the doorway leading to it was concealed by a revolving bookcase that was constructed particularly for the purpose. There were eight people in hiding in the annex and the office personnel also knew of this. They helped the people in hiding by supplying food and news of the happenings outside. The hiding place was compromised on August 4th, 1944, and the inmates were deported. It was only Otto Frank who managed to survive the war.

There was a point post-liberation when there were active plans to demolish the building at Prinsengracht 263 but as the story about life in the Secret Annex became known to many people through Anne Frank’s diary, many resisted the plans of demolition. In the middle of the 1950s, the Anne Frank House Foundation was established which ended the demolition plans. With sincere efforts of the foundation, the building was restored and opened to the public on 3rd May 1960.

Anne Frank House: The Spot Much Visited By History Enthusiasts 

Although the rooms in the house are empty, the place has a lot to tell about the horror that the family went through during the Second World War. The original objects that belonged to the people that were in hiding are still preserved and films have been made illustrating the events from historical excerpts of that time and most importantly the diary of Anne Frank.

The tickets to Anne Frank House are often sold months in advance. The peak season is the summer when people from different parts of the world visit the place to get a glimpse of the living remnants of history. The museum is up and running during the months of March up to October. If you are want to avoid crowds and make a visit peacefully, we recommend you to visit the place in the late afternoons or early evenings because the museum is quieter in the evenings.